Nora Danielson Lanier DPhil Anthropology

nora.danielson@anthro.ox.ac.uk

Nora Danielson Lanier is a DPhil researcher in anthropology at the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology and the Centre on Migration, Policy and Society at the University of Oxford, where she completed an MPhil in Migration Studies (Distinction). Her research is focussed on refugee protest and the politics of asylum governance. Her doctoral thesis examines these politics through the 2005 case of a three month sit-in by several thousand Sudanese refugees at the Cairo offices of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, which she started researching while living in Cairo, 2005-6, followed by fieldwork in Cairo, 2010-12.

Nora was co-founder of the University of Oxford’s Migration Studies Society and the Fahamu Refugee Legal Aid Newsletter (now Rights in Exile), and has taught on anthropology of gender, research methods, and refugee and migration studies at the American University in Cairo, the University of East London, and the University of Oxford. Before embarking on postgraduate research, she worked in North America as a touring musician and as a support provider for people with developmental disabilities.

Publications

2015. ‘Demonstrable needs: protest, politics, and refugees in Cairo’. In Koizumi, K. and Hoffstaedter, G. (eds.), Urban refugees: challenges in protection, services and policy. Routledge.

2013. ‘Channels of protection: communication, technology, and asylum in Cairo, Egypt’. Refuge 29(1): 31-42; Special Issue: Technology’s role in the refugee experience.

2012. ‘Field report: revolution, its aftermath, and access to information for refugees in Cairo’. Oxford Monitor of Forced Migration 2(2): 57-63.

2012. ‘Urban refugee protection in Cairo, Egypt: the role of information, communication and technology’. New Issues in Refugee Research.

2006. Co-author, Azzam, F. (ed.) and others. ‘A tragedy of failures and false expectations: report on the events surrounding the three month sit-in and forced removal of Sudanese refugees in Cairo, September-December 2005’. Working paper, Forced Migration and Refugee Studies Program, American University in Cairo.